Staircase Negotiation Learning for Articulated Tracked Robots with Varying Degrees of Freedom - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Conference Papers Year : 2020

Staircase Negotiation Learning for Articulated Tracked Robots with Varying Degrees of Freedom

(1, 2) , (1, 2) , (1, 2) , (2)
1
2

Abstract

Tracked robots capable of negotiating 3D terrains require delicate control, most often tailored to a specific platform or setting. For staircase traversal in particular, autonomous robot behaviours are difficult to obtain due to the increased risk of accident and stochasticity. Based on a previously developed reinforcement learning based framework that allows learning staircase ascent for an articulated tracked robot, in this work we extend our work to allow also staircase descent and further investigate the role of a manipulating arm in the stability and smoothness of the traversal. By relying on a precise simulation of geometry and kinematics of a real robot, we demonstrate prototype policies for staircase ascent and descent, optionally under the influence of an integrated active arm and different penalty criteria. The obtained results are qualitatively and quantitatively compared and show that the robot can learn plausible behaviors effectively, when guided by appropriate reward and penalty criteria.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
Mitriakov-et-al-SSRR2020-Staircase-Negotiation-Learning-for-Articulated-Tracked-Robots-with-Varying-Degrees-of-Freedom.pdf (1.41 Mo) Télécharger le fichier
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)
Loading...

Dates and versions

hal-03001120 , version 1 (12-11-2020)

Identifiers

Cite

Andrei Mitriakov, Panagiotis Papadakis, Sao Mai Nguyen, Serge Garlatti. Staircase Negotiation Learning for Articulated Tracked Robots with Varying Degrees of Freedom. SSRR 2020: IEEE International Conference on Safety, Security and Rescue Robotics, Nov 2020, Abu Dabi (virtual), United Arab Emirates. ⟨10.1109/SSRR50563.2020.9292594⟩. ⟨hal-03001120⟩
68 View
131 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More